How do you Solve a Problem Like Big Data?

This post is not about how to analyze big data – it is about impact and implications for laws, business and our society.  How do we ensure that our increasing reliance on data, algorithms and AI does not come at a cost?

Below, I include some great articles on the topic.  Please read on, and would love to hear your thoughts via the comments section below.

Bloomberg: Battling the Tyranny of Big Data

Mark Buchanan explores recent research and efforts, such as the Open Algorithms Projects; he says we must control how data are used, second, open up by making it more widely available, then re-balance power between companies and individuals.

Mashable: We put too much Trust in Algorithms, and it’s Hurting our Most Vulnerable

Algorithms have gone wild in Ariel Bogle’s piece; they incorrectly label welfare recipients as cheats, and blacks, recidivist risks, give rise to “mathwashing.”

Huffington Post: We need to know the Algorithms the Government uses to make important Decisions about Us

Writer Nick Diakopoulos, Fellow at Columbia Tow Center; Assistant Professor of Journalism, University of Maryland, cites similar issues, and shares a case study in transparency in which he “guided students in submitting FOIA requests to each of the 50 states. We asked for documents, mathematical descriptions, data, validation assessments, contracts and source code related to algorithms used in criminal justice, such as for parole and probation, bail or sentencing decisions.”

PHYS ORG: Opinion – Should Algorithms be Regulated?

Offers a point vs. counterpoint; Markus Ehrenmann of Swisscom says “Yes.” Mouloud Dey of SAS says “No.”

Seth Godin’s blog: The Candy Diet

The marketing guru says that algorithms are dumbing down media.

The Drum: In the Post Truth Era, the Quest to Surface Credible Content has only Just Begun

Lisa Lacy reports that Google amended its algorithm to combat holocaust deniers; but if manual intervention is needed for high profile fails, but what about other important issues that don’t get as much attention?

Foundation for Economic Education: What Happens when your Boss is an Algorithm?

Cathy Reisenwitz offers a nice primer, and argues for making algorithms open source.

The New York Times: Data Could be the Next Tech Hot Button for Regulators

Steve Lohr voices concerns about the growing market power of big tech, and explains potential antitrust issues arising from their collection of data. He writes: “The European Commission and the British House of Lords both issued reports last year on digital “platform” companies that highlighted the essential role that data collection, analysis and distribution play in creating and shaping markets. And the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development held a meeting in November to explore the subject, “Big Data: Bringing Competition Policy to the Digital Era.”



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DigiDig Studies the Impact of AI and Algorithms on Society

banner-1571986_1920Full story is on Flack’s Revenge

I’ve had many great conversations with my friend and PR authority Toni Muzi Falcone about the impact of technology on the field and society at large. Recently he told me about a new effort that he helped conceive – DigiDig – a website and citizen-led group dedicated to studying this area.

They started in Italy (the website for now is almost entirely in Italian) and have an international focus. I asked Toni to tell me more, and he shared the following:

“DigiDig questions the algorithmic society. It is a start-up community, launched on October 9, 2016, of some 150 Italian digitally active and prominent citizens wishing to better understand, discuss and raise awareness of peers on issues related to ‘user power’ vis-à-vis XXI century global robber barons.

The intention is to connect with the many similar or analog groups that populate the global digital space. Our immediate focus includes Brussels and New York, but we also wish to dialog with New Zealand, Kazakhstan and Namibia.

Its promoters are academics, intellectuals, journalists, managers, lobbyists, elected officials, communicators, writers, sociologists, and polemicists.

Following two open house sessions in Rome and Milano last June, a coordinating committee of six was formed and a web space just opened a few days ago containing a shared ‘manifesto’ plus opinions and comments in Italian and English.

The manifesto, titled: ‘the algorithm as a technology of freedom?’, defines its main issue as

(…..) the active and critical observation of the true nature of the global process reorganizing social and economic life, focused on the development and exchange of cognitive products of artificial intelligence.

As algorithms simplify digital procedures as well as the automation of humanity’s most delicate and discretionary activities, we cannot accept that such process proceeds in disrespect of the elementary rules of transparency, information and access to participation to its decision-making processes and operational standards.

If it is true that –as often affirmed by creators, shareholders and executives of those global groups – we are in fact confronted with a new ‘public sphere and/or space’ (and we very much believe it is so) – we also insist that the mechanisms creating new alphabets, social structures and determining influences over individual choices, need to be understandable, shared, socially negotiable and integrated.(…).

No membership fees, but requests for contributions via PayPal at info@digidig.it



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